Associate in Engineering AE

NC State Engineering program student tinkering with project

Associate in Engineering AE

Program Code: A10500

Our Associate in Engineering (AE) program is offered through a unique partnership with North Carolina State University (NC State). There is no other community college in the state that can offer you a program such as this.

The AE program is a progression degree plan which meets the entrance requirements at all of the North Carolina public Bachelor of Science engineering programs. Graduates of this program may then apply to any of these programs without taking additional and sometimes duplicate courses.

The AE program enables you to take advantage of opportunities like these:

  • Receive an introduction to engineering from NC State faculty
  • Access NC State facilities on the Havelock campus for hands-on design projects
  • Participate in enrichment opportunities such as design competitions, community outreach design projects, robot competitions, engineering club, plant tours, and technical seminars
  • Obtain all courses needed to transfer to one of the four-year engineering schools in North Carolina
  • Take sophomore-level mechanical engineering courses from NC State while still a Craven CC student
  • Work directly with some of the over 900 Department of Defense engineers at Cherry Point
  • Obtain a four-year Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree with a concentration in Mechanical Engineering Systems from NC State without ever leaving Craven County

This program is also available to high school students through our Career & College Promise program.

Skills You’ll Learn

The Associate in Engineering program is focused on job-related skills in the following areas:

  • Integrating content across STEM disciplines
  • Demonstrating the ability to formally collect, interpret, and formulate conclusions from data using both quantitative and qualitative methods
  • Writing and speaking with clarity, coherence, and persuasiveness
  • Demonstrating how historical, philosophical, cultural, global, and socioeconomic factors affect human interactions and behaviors
  • Using the theories of calculus and physics to model the physical world in order to make decisions or solve problems

Career Opportunities

There are many employment opportunities for Associate in Engineering graduates, including:

  • Research and development or laboratory opportunities
  • Positions in education on primary or secondary level
  • Other fields requiring mathematics/engineering proficiency

Degree requirements

General Education: 42 Credits + Other Hours: 18 Credits = Total for Graduation: 60 Credits

General Education Core (42 SHC)

Universal Transfer Component

(32 SHC) All Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) courses will transfer to any one of the 16 UNC-System universities. Exceptions. Courses which are not classified as UGETC are indicated in each section.

Courses in this program

6 SHC Required

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course is designed to develop the ability to produce clear writing in a variety of genres and formats using a recursive process. Emphasis includes inquiry, analysis, effective use of rhetorical strategies, thesis development, audience awareness, and revision. Upon completion, students should be able to produce unified, coherent, well-developed essays using standard written English.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One Set:,Set 1: DRE-097,Set 2: ENG-002,Set 3: BSP-4002
  • Corequisites:
    Take ENG-011

This course, the second in a series of two, introduces research techniques, documentation, styles, and writing strategies. Emphasis is placed on analyzing information and ideas and incorporating research findings into documented writing and research projects. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate and synthesize information from primary and secondary sources using documentation appropriate to various disciplines.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take ENG-111
  • Corequisites:
    None

6 SHC required. Select two courses from two different disciplines (prefixes). UGETC exception: REL-110. Choose one course from ENG-231, ENG-232, PHI-215, PHI-240, REL-110. Choose one course from ART-111, ART-114, ART-115, MUS-110, MUS-112, COM-120, COM-231

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course covers selected works in American literature from its beginnings to 1865. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural, context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and interpret literary works in their historical and cultural contexts.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One: ENG-112, ENG 113, or ENG 114
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course covers selected works in American literature from 1865 to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural, context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and interpret literary works in their historical and cultural contexts.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One: ENG-112, ENG-113, or ENG-114
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course introduces fundamental issues in philosophy considering the views of classical and contemporary philosophers. Emphasis is placed on knowledge and belief, appearance and reality, determinism and free will, faith and reason, and justice and inequality. Upon completion, students should be able to identify, analyze, and critically evaluate the philosophical components of an issue.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take ENG-111
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course introduces theories about the nature and foundations of moral judgments and applications to contemporary moral issues. Emphasis is placed on moral theories such as consequentialism, deontology, and virtue ethics. Upon completion, students should be able to apply various ethical theories to moral issues such as abortion, capital punishment, poverty, war, terrorism, the treatment of animals, and issues arising from new technologies.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take ENG-111
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course introduces the world's major religious traditions. Topics include Primal religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Judaism, and Christianity. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the origins, history, beliefs, and practices of the religions studied.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One: DRE-097, ENG-002, BSP-4002, ENG-111
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course introduces the origins and historical development of art. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of design principles to various art forms including but not limited to sculpture, painting, and architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods, and media.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One: DRE-097, ENG-002, BSP-4002, ENG-111
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course covers the development of art forms from ancient times to the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed on content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an historical understanding of art as a product reflective of human social development.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One: DRE-097, ENG-002, BSP-4002, ENG-111
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course covers the development of art forms from the Renaissance to the present. Emphasis is placed on content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an historical understanding of art as a product reflective of human social development.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One: DRE-097, ENG-002, BSP-4002, ENG-111
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course is a basic survey of the music of the Western world. Emphasis is placed on the elements of music, terminology, composers, form, and style within a historical perspective. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in basic listening and understanding of the art of music.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One: DRE-097, ENG-002, BSP-4002, ENG-111
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course introduces the origins and musical components of jazz and the contributions of its major artists. Emphasis is placed on the development of discriminating listening habits, as well as the investigation of the styles and structural forms of the jazz idiom. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in listening and understanding this form of American music.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    DRE 097, ENG 002 P1, or satisfactory reading and math placement scores
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course introduces the practices and principles of interpersonal communication in both dyadic and group settings. Emphasis is placed on the communication process, perception, listening, self-disclosure, speech apprehension, ethics, nonverbal communication, conflict, power, and dysfunctional communication relationships. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate interpersonal communication skills, apply basic principles of group discussion, and manage conflict in interpersonal communication situations.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One: DRE-097, ENG-002, BSP-4002, ENG-111
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One: DRE-097, ENG-002, BSP-4002, ENG-111
  • Corequisites:
    None

6 SHC required. ECO-251 is required.

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces economic analysis of individual, business, and industry in the market economy. Topics include the price mechanism, supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, costs and revenue, market structures, factor markets, income distribution, market failure, and government intervention. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and evaluate consumer and business alternatives in order to efficiently achieve economic objectives.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One Set:, Set 1: DMA-010, DMA-020, and DMA-030, Set 2: MAT-010, Set 3: MAT-021, Set 4: MAT-043, Set 5: MAT-052, Set 6: MAT-071,Set 7: MAT-110, Set 8: MAT-121, Set 9: MAT-143, Set 10: MAT-152,Set 11: MAT-171,Set 11: MAT-003 with P1 Grade, Set 13: BSP-4003 with P1 Grade, Take One:, DRE-097, ENG-002, BSP-4002, ENG-111
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course introduces world history from the dawn of civilization to the early modern era. Topics include Eurasian, African, American, and Greco-Roman civilizations and Christian, Islamic, and Byzantine cultures. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in pre-modern world civilizations.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One: DRE-097, ENG-002, BSP-4002, ENG-111
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course introduces world history from the early modern era to the present. Topics include the cultures of Africa, Europe, India, China, Japan, and the Americas. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in modern world civilizations.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One: DRE-097, ENG-002, BSP-4002, ENG-111
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course is a survey of American history from pre-history through the Civil War era. Topics include the migrations to the Americas, the colonial and revolutionary periods, the development of the Republic, and the Civil War. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in early American history.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One: DRE-097, ENG-002, BSP-4002, ENG-111
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course is a survey of American history from the Civil War era to the present. Topics include industrialization, immigration, the Great Depression, the major American wars, the Cold War, and social conflict. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in American history since the Civil War.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One: DRE-097, ENG-002, BSP-4002, ENG-111
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course is a study of the origins, development, structure, and functions of American government. Topics include the constitutional framework, federalism, the three branches of government including the bureaucracy, civil rights and liberties, political participation and behavior, and policy process. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts and participatory processes of the American political system.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One: DRE-097, ENG-002, BSP-4002, ENG-111
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One from:, DRE-097, ENG-002, BSP-4002
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions. Topics include socialization, research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of sociological concepts as they apply to the interplay among individuals, groups, and societies.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One: DRE-097, ENG-002, BSP-4002, ENG-111
  • Corequisites:
    None

12 SHC required. UGETC exeption: MAT-273. Calculas I is the lowest level math course that will be accepted by the engineering programs for transfer as a math credit. Students who are not calculas-ready will need to take additional math credits.

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course is designed to develop the topics of differential and integral calculus. Emphasis is placed on limits, continuity, derivatives and integrals of algebraic and transcendental, functions of one variable. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to derivative-related problems with and without technology.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 3  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 4 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take: MAT-172
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course is designed to develop advanced topics of differential and integral calculus. Emphasis is placed on the applications of definite integrals, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite, series, conic sections, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and differential equations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to integral-related problems with and without technology.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 3  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 4 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take MAT-271, Take MAT-271,Minimum grade C
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course is designed to develop the topics of multivariate calculus. Emphasis is placed on multivariate functions, partial derivatives, multiple integration, solid analytical geometry, vector valued functions, and line and surface integrals. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding the solution to multivariate-related problems with and without technology.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 3  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 4 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take MAT-272, Take MAT-272,Minimum grade C
  • Corequisites:
    None

12 SHC required.

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course covers fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include measurement, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, gas laws, and solutions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical laws and concepts as needed in CHM 152.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 3  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 4 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take ENG-002, Complete MAT-003 with P2 grade level, MAT-171
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vector operations, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, rotational mechanics, periodic motion, fluid, mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 3  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 4 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take MAT-271
  • Corequisites:
    Take MAT-272

This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include electrostatic forces, electric fields, electric potentials, direct-current circuits, magnetostatic forces, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, alternating-current circuits, and light. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 3  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 4 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take All: MAT-272 and PHY-251
  • Corequisites:
    None

Other Required Hours (18 SHC)

Courses in this program

1 SHC required.

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course provides information and strategies necessary to develop clear academic and professional goals beyond the community college experience. Topics include the CAA, college policies and culture, career exploration, gathering information on senior institutions, strategic planning, critical thinking, and communications skills for a successful academic transition. Upon completion, students should be able to develop an academic plan to transition successfully to senior institutions.

Lecture Hours: 0  Lab Hours: 2  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 1 
  • Prerequisites:
    None
  • Corequisites:
    None

2 SHC required.

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course is an overview of the engineering profession. Topics include goal setting and career assessment, ethics, public safety, the engineering method and design process, written and oral communication, interpersonal skills and team building, and computer applications. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the engineering process, the engineering profession, and utilize college resources to meet their educational goals.

Lecture Hours: 1  Lab Hours: 1  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 2 
  • Prerequisites:
    None
  • Corequisites:
    None

Select 15 SHC of courses from the following courses classified as pre-major, elective, or general education courses within the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement. Students must meet the receiving university's foreign language and/or health and physical education requirements, if applicable, prior to or after transfer to the senior institution. Students should choose courses appropriate to the specific university and engineering major requirements.

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces the principles and concepts of biology. Emphasis is placed on basic biological chemistry, molecular and cellular biology, metabolism and energy transformation, genetics, evolution, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate understanding of life at the molecular and cellular levels.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 3  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 4 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One:, DRE-097, ENG-002, BSP-4002, ENG-111, Complete MAT-003 with P2 grade level
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course provides a continuation of the study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include kinetics, equilibrium, ionic and redox equations, acid-base theory, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, introduction to nuclear and organic chemistry, and complex ions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical concepts as needed to pursue further study in chemistry and related professional fields.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 3  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 4 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take CHM-151, Take MAT-171
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course provides an overview of the basic concepts of communication and the skills necessary to communicate in various contexts. Emphasis is placed on communication theories and techniques used in interpersonal group, public, intercultural, and mass communication situations. Upon completion, students should be able to explain and illustrate the forms and purposes of human communication in a variety of contexts.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One: DRE-097, ENG-002, BSP-4002, ENG-111
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course introduces computer programming using the C++ programming language with object-oriented programming principles. Emphasis is placed on event-driven programming methods, including creating and manipulating objects, classes, and using object-oriented tools such as the class debugger. Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, test and debug at a beginning level.

Lecture Hours: 2  Lab Hours: 2  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Complete MAT-003 with P2 grade level
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course introduces computer programming using the JAVA programming language with object-oriented programming principles. Emphasis is placed on event-driven programming methods, including creating and manipulating objects, classes, and using object-oriented tools such as the class debugger. Upon completion students should be able to design, code, test, debug JAVA language programs.

Lecture Hours: 2  Lab Hours: 2  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Complete MAT-003 with P2 grade level
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course introduces basic engineering graphics skills and applications. Topics include sketching, selection and use of current methods and tools, and the use of engineering graphics applications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic engineering graphics principles and practices.

Lecture Hours: 2  Lab Hours: 2  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    None
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course introduces economic analysis of aggregate employment, income, and prices. Topics include major schools of economic thought; aggregate supply and demand; economic measures, fluctuations, and growth; money and banking; stabilization techniques; and international trade. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate national economic components, conditions, and alternatives for achieving socioeconomic goals.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One Set:, Set 1: DMA-010, DMA-020, and DMA-030, Set 2: MAT-010, Set 3: MAT-021, Set 4: MAT-043, Set 5: MAT-052, Set 6: MAT-071, Set 7: MAT-110, Set 8: MAT-121,Set 9: MAT-143, Set 10: MAT-152, Set 11: MAT-171, Set 11: MAT-003 with P1 Grade, Set 13: BSP-4003 with P1 Grade, Take One:, DRE-097, ENG-002, BSP-4002, ENG-111
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course introduces the concepts of engineering based on forces in equilibrium. Topics include concentrated forces, distributed forces, forces due to friction, an inertia as they apply to machines, structures and systems. Upon completion, students should be able to solve problems which require the ability to analyze systems of forces in static equalibrium.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    PHY 251
  • Corequisites:
    MAT 272

This course introduces the concepts of engineering based on the analysis of motion in Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical coordinate systems. Topics include the two and three dimensional motion of particles and rigid bodies, the forces associated with that motion, and relative motion between two coordinate systems. Upon completion, students should be able to solve problems which require the ability to analyze the motion and forces involved in a dynamic system

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take EGR-220
  • Corequisites:
    Take MAT-273

This course considers technological change from historical, artistic, and philosophical perspectives and its effect on human needs and concerns. Emphasis is placed on the causes and consequences of technological change. Upon completion, students should be able to critically evaluate the implications of technology.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One: DRE-097, ENG-002, BSP-4002, ENG-111
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course provides an introduction to linear algebra topics. Emphasis is placed on the development of abstract concepts and applications for vectors, systems of equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, multi-dimensional linear transformations, eigenvectors, eigenvalues, diagonalization and orthogonality. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the theoretical concepts and select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to linear algebra-related problems with and without technology.

Lecture Hours: 3  Lab Hours: 3  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take MAT-271
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course provides an introduction to topics involving ordinary differential equations. Emphasis is placed on the development of abstract concepts and applications for first-order and linear higher-order differential equations, systems of differential equations, numerical, methods, series solutions, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and LaPlace transforms.

Lecture Hours: 2  Lab Hours: 2  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 3 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take MAT-272
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course is designed to investigate and apply the basic concepts and principles of lifetime physical fitness and other health-related factors. Emphasis is placed on wellness through the study of nutrition, weight control, stress management, and consumer facts on exercise and fitness. Upon completion, students should be able to plan a personal, lifelong fitness program based on individual needs, abilities, and interests.

Lecture Hours: 1  Lab Hours: 1  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 2 
  • Prerequisites:
    None
  • Corequisites:
    None

Questions others are asking.

We offer several credentials that provide the flexibility you need. Most degree programs last two years and provide the most in-depth study of a particular subject. Diplomas and certificates take less time and are often taken in conjunction with other degree programs. Specialized training is also available for workforce development programs that are completed in less than a year.

Craven Community College has special relationships with upper-level colleges and universities for transfer. These transfer institutions include:

  • Four-year institutions in the University of North Carolina System
  • Private North Carolina four-year institutions
  • Partnership on the Havelock campus for a four-year Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree with a concentration in Mechanical Engineering Systems from NC State

To be eligible to transfer credits under the AE to BSE articulation agreement, a student must earn an AE degree in a North Carolina Community College with a GPA of at least 2.5 and a grade of C or better in all AE courses.

To provide for a smooth transfer, students should consult with both an academic advisor and the potential transfer institution for academic course selection and guidance.

Students who wish to enter the NC State/Craven CC engineering program must first enroll at Craven Community College to complete courses required to transfer to a four-year engineering program. Once completed, students can apply for transfer admission to NC State in Havelock, NC State-Raleigh, ECU, UNC-Charlotte, or NC A&T. To get started, complete a Craven CC online application and then make an appointment to speak with a Craven CC advisor.

If you are ready to start in MAT 271, then you will be enrolled directly into the Associate in Science or Associate in Engineering program and can be ready to transfer in two years. For some engineering disciplines and students on financial aid, it may benefit you to transfer after one year at Craven CC. Make sure you talk with the NC State engineering advisor before the end of your fall semester. Email mspitman@ncsu.edu or call 252-444-8209 for an advising appointment.

If you are not ready for MAT 271, Craven CC is still the place for you. Math is your first priority and at whatever level you are in math, Craven CC offers the courses you need to prepare for MAT 271. A Craven CC advisor can help you develop a plan.

Specific requirements for the four-year engineering degree and transfer requirements can be found on the NC State/Craven CC engineering site and the two-year degree requirements while at Craven CC should follow the Associate of Science or the Associate in Engineering degree’s course of study.

Admission to this program requires that students be high school graduates or have a recognized equivalency.

Before initiating study for an A.E. degree, a student must have achieved a mathematical proficiency, to include MAT 171-Precalculus Algebra and MAT 172-Precalculus Trigonometry. If this is not the case, the student must speak with an advisor in order to choose the proper preparatory courses.

Calculus I is the lowest level math course that will be accepted by the engineering programs for transfer as a math credit. Students who are not calculus-ready will need to take additional math courses.

For degree completion, students are required to successfully complete 42 general education hours and 18 hours of elective credit. Craven Community College has also identified Introduction to Engineering and ACA as required courses. You may learn more about the program of study for the AE degree by reviewing the degree plan or by contacting a Liberal Arts & University Transfer Center Advisor.

To be eligible for the transfer of credits under the AE to the Bachelor of Science in Engineering articulation agreement, community college graduates must obtain a grade of “C” or better in each course and an overall GPA of at least 2.5 on a 4.0 scale.

Contact Information

Liberal Arts and University Transfer
Business & Information Technology Building
New Bern Campus
252-638-0141

form.#attributes
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