CNC Operator Certificate

Program Description

The Computer-Integrated Machining curriculum prepares students with the analytical, creative and innovative skills necessary to take a production idea from an initial concept through design, development and production, resulting in a finished product. 

Coursework may include manual machining,
computer applications, engineering design, computer-aided drafting (CAD), computer-aided machining (CAM), blueprint interpretation, advanced computerized numeric control (CNC) equipment, basic and advanced machining operations, precision measurement and high-speed multi-axis machining.

Graduates should qualify for employment as machining technicians in high-tech manufacturing, rapid-prototyping and rapid-manufacturing industries, specialty machine shops, fabrication industries, and high-tech or emerging industries such as aerospace, aviation, medical, and renewable energy, and to sit for machining certification examinations.

Admission Criteria

Admission to this program requires that students be high school graduates or have a recognized equivalency. 

Program Learning Outcomes

Graduates of this program will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an ability to interpret mechanical work drawings, and develop/produce complex parts from these drawings, using a variety of machining tools and CNC equipment
  • Demonstrate proficiency in the use of CNC tools and equipment to include programming the CNC machine, set-up, operation, control functions, and inspection
  • Demonstrate proficiency in set-up and operation of advanced CNC machining techniques to include, turning, milling, wire EDM machining, and CNC programming
  • Demonstrate proficiency in CNC Graphics and Multi-Axis Machining to include the use of CAD/CAM software, tool path and part geometry, operations sequencing, speed, feed and cutting depth.

 Career Opportunities

Graduates should qualify for employment in:

  • aerospace product and parts manufacturing
  • motor vehicle parts manufacturing metalworking machinery manufacturing
  • machine shops
  • other industrial settings

Transfer Opportunities

While the AAS is a degree leading to immediate job placement upon graduation, Craven Community College has a special relationship for transfer to a BS degree in Industrial Technology with East Carolina University.

Contact Information

Executive Director of Career Programs
252-638-7372

Admissions Office
252-638-7430

Certificate Requirements

Courses in this program

Certificate Classes

Course Course Code Credit Hours Link to course details

This course introduces the concepts and capabilities of computer numerical control machine tools. Topics include setup, operation, and basic applications. Upon completion, students should be able to explain operator safety, machine protection, data input, program preparation, and program storage.

Lecture Hours: 2  Lab Hours: 0  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 2 
  • Prerequisites:
    None
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course introduces the programming, setup, and, operation of CNC turning centers. Topics include programming formats, control functions, program, editing, part production, and inspection. Upon completion, students should be able to manufacture simple parts using CNC turning centers.

Lecture Hours: 1  Lab Hours: 1  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 2 
  • Prerequisites:
    None
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course introduces the manual programming, setup, and operation of CNC machining centers. Topics include programming formats, control, functions, program editing, part production, and inspection. Upon completion, students should be able to manufacture simple parts using CNC machining centers.

Lecture Hours: 1  Lab Hours: 1  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 2 
  • Prerequisites:
    None
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course introduces CNC operations used in precision metal fabrication. Topics include CNC control of shears, brakes, punch presses, and lasers and the programming techniques used to produce parts. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of equipment, operations, CNC control functions, and part programming.

Lecture Hours: 1  Lab Hours: 1  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 2 
  • Prerequisites:
    None
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course introduces the basic principles of print reading. Topics include line types, orthographic projections, dimensioning methods, and notes. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret basic prints and visualize the features of a part or system.

Lecture Hours: 1  Lab Hours: 1  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 2 
  • Prerequisites:
    None
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course covers the interpretation of intermediate blueprints. Topics include tolerancing, auxiliary views, sectional views, and assembly drawings. Upon completion, students should be able to read and interpret a mechanical working drawing.

Lecture Hours: 1  Lab Hours: 1  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 2 
  • Prerequisites:
    Take One: BPR-111 or MAC-131
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course introduces the programming, setup, and operation of CNC electrical discharge machines. Topics include programming formats, control, functions, program editing, production of parts, and inspection. Upon completion, students should be able to manufacture simple parts using CNC electrical discharge machines.

Lecture Hours: 1  Lab Hours: 1  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 2 
  • Prerequisites:
    None
  • Corequisites:
    None

This course covers product planning and control and scheduling and routing of operations. Topics include cost-effective production methods, dimensional and statistical quality control, and the tooling and machines required for production. Upon completion, students should be able to plan, set up, and produce cost-effective quality machined parts.

Lecture Hours: 1  Lab Hours: 1  Clinical Hours: 0  Credit Hours: 2 
  • Prerequisites:
    None
  • Corequisites:
    None